Section 3: Increasing collaboration and communication using OGT data

Goal-setting Tips for The Collaborative Teacher Team

The first step in analyzing and understanding student OGT performance is reviewing the Online Score Report data with your department or grade-level collaborative team and discussing performance patterns.

The next step is to consider why these student performance patterns exist.

Using Online Score Report Data to Determine Students’ Strengths

To apply the OGT data for further investigation, view your district or school’s Online Score Report and View All Students’ Scores data to determine what your students’ strengths are and determine what positive patterns exist. Understanding these can help you examine what factors contribute to strong student performance.

Grade 9 and Grade 10 Teachers: Share the Online Score Report data with your collaborative team to view subject areas where students did well throughout your school. Using this data, collaborate with other teachers to determine which strategies helped students achieve success in these subject areas.

Grade 11 and Intervention Teachers: Share the Online Score Report data with your collaborative team to help determine positive performance patterns on which you can build.

Using Online Score Report Data to Determine Students’ Weaknesses

Next, examine areas that need improvement. Look at the Online Score Report data to identify areas for improvement in your school.

Grade 9 and Grade 10 Teachers:  Knowing which subject areas and specific content standards challenged those students who took the previous OGT may help you prepare students taking the OGT for the first time.

Grade 11 and Intervention Teachers: Exploring individual student data and custom group data will help you focus your instruction on those areas in which students need additional instruction.

A Note About Using Multiple Sources of Data

Remember that the areas of strength and areas of need shown online provide only a general outline of student performance. The OGT is just one source of data. You should balance these data with other data you have about student learning, such as information from class work, classroom-based assessments, observations of student learning, and discussions you have with students.